SPEECH BY OTUNBA (DR.) GANI ADAMS AT HIS INSTALLATION AS THE 15TH AARE ONA KAKANFO OF YORUBALAND BY THE ALAAFIN OF OYO, IKU BABA YEYE, HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY, OBA LAMIDI OLAYIWOLA ADEYEMI III.

 
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Date: Saturday January 13, 2018
Venue: Durbar Stadium, Oyo
 
Time: 11am
 
PROTOCOLS
 
Mo juba awon Aare Ona Kakanfo to siwaju mi:
 
Kokoro Gangan of Iwoye
 
Oyapote of Iwoye
 
Oyabi of Ajase
 
Adeta of Jabata
 
Oku of Jabata
 
Afonja of Ilorin
 
Toyeje of Ogbomoso
 
Edun of Gbogun
 
Amepo of Abemo
 
Kurumi of Ijaiye
 
Ojo Aburumaku of Ogbomoso (son of Toyeje of Ogbomosho)
 
Latoosa of Ibadan
 
Ladoke Akintola of Ogbomoso
 
M.K.O. Abiola of Abeokuta
 
There cannot be a more humbling occasion for me as the one we are in today.
 
Against the backdrop of the size of the office the Iku Baba Yeye, His Imperial Majesty, the Alaafin of Oyo, Oba Lamidi Olayiwola Atanda Adeyemi III, has bestowed on me and the larger than life image of my predecessors, my installation as the 15th Aare Ona Kakanfo is a challenge that has made all past challenges seem like a child’s play.
 
Though I am just stepping into the office, past occupants of the seat, especially the 13th and 14th occupants – Aare Samuel Ladoke Akintola and Aare Moshood Kashimawo Olawale Abiola – brought so much power and glamour to the office that it is obvious I have a lot of work to do. As astute businessmen and politicians of note, they raised the profile of the office.
 
There is no doubt from the reactions that followed my pronouncement by the Alaafin of Oyo as the 15th Aare Ona Kakanfo that the power and prestige of the office has not waned since it was created centuries ago by Alaafin Ajagbo.
 
In fact, the epoch-making event of today is symbolic as 2018 marks the 558th anniversary of the installation of the first Aare Ona Kakanfo – Kokoro Gangan of Iwoye.
 
It is of interest to note that the military, political, traditional and cultural symbolism of the title to the Yoruba Empire, about 600 years ago, is still of strategic importance in the 21st Century.
 
This attribute reveals the uniqueness of the Yoruba race and shows that so much is still expected of the occupant of the post, despite the fact that physical and armed wars are no longer the order of the day.
 
In fact, despite the fact that I am an holder of 52 traditional titles, none has drawn as much comments and commendation by way of letters and visits.
 
The import of the Office still stands: protection of the interests of Yoruba race, both within the country and everywhere else people of the race exist.
 
While it is estimated that there are 60 million Yoruba within Nigeria and about 200 million others scattered all over the world, as a starting point, the preservation of the culture of the race will occupy my attention.
 
Pitiably, as a race, we are gradually losing our culture. In fact, from my travels around the world, it has become obvious that people of other races are taking more interest in our culture than we the owners of the culture, with Americans, Europeans and Asians now earning Degrees in the study of our culture, beliefs and what they have come to term Doctrine. We need to preserve our culture to fully realize the potential of the Yoruba.
 
Though with an activist background, it is now clear that I have to do more as a bridge builder with this new responsibility.
 
In as much as the focus of my struggle has changed over the years from the heady days of the Oodua People’s Congress (OPC) to the spread of our culture through the formation of the Oodua Progressive Union (OPU), which is now in 79 countries, the Olokun Festival Foundation, Gani Adams Foundation and many others, this new responsibility, despite my age, has unwittingly forced the stature of a statesman on me.
 
I promise to live up to that calling.
 
In this regard, I will work with our traditional rulers, grassroots leaders and have good rapport with all stakeholders, no matter the differences of the past, for the unity, progress and advancement of Yorubaland and Nigeria.
 
The office of the Aare Ona Kakanfo will project the Yoruba culture and tradition by promoting and sustaining our identity globally.
 
The office will equally ensure unity of all Yoruba sons and daughters all over the world.
 
Also of strategic importance to me is research and documentary to sustain the ideals of our founding fathers.
 
To ensure the continuation of the leadership role the Yoruba is known for educationally, I will give scholarships to our sons and daughters because education is light and power.
 
Also, I will collaborate with security agencies and stakeholders to ensure that Yorubaland is effectively secured through our various organizations.
 
I want to assure this August gathering that given the fact that the Oodua Progressives Union (OPU), which I am also the Convener, is now established in 79 countries, I will use this Union and other pan-Yoruba groups abroad to invite our sons and daughters with exceptional abilities, who have distinguished themselves in various fields, to come home and help in our quest to ensuring that our country takes its rightful place in the comity of nations.
 
GRATITUDE
 
At this juncture, let me express my profound gratitude to all our revered traditional rulers who have been working tirelessly to unite our race. It is a long list that it will not be possible to mention all.
 
But let me use the following to pay tribute to our traditional rulers: the Alaafin of Oyo, Iku Baba Yeye, Oba Lamidi Olayiwola Adeyemi III who has deemed it fit to honour me with this prestigious title, the Ooni of Ife, Oonirisa Enitan Adeyeye Ogunwusi, Ojaja II; Chairmen of Council of Obas and Chiefs and all traditional rulers in Yorubaland, and not forgetting my root, the Zaki of Arigidi-Akoko, Oba Yisa Olanipekun, and all traditional rulers in Akokoland; all the Obas who bestowed me with 52 titles, which invariably laid the foundation for my emergence as the Aare Ona Kakanfo.
 
CALL FOR UNITY
 
The journey has started from here. And my first appeal goes to Yoruba sons and daughters who are outside the shores of the country not to forget that there is no place like home. This was what informed the formation of the Oodua Progressives Union (OPU), Gani Adams Foundation and Olokun Festival Foundation. Please, see Yorubaland as the place to be. Don’t give the race a bad name. Come home to invest.
 
As the 15th Aare Ona Kakanafo, I consider myself lucky that there is no war at hand confronting the Yoruba race now. In other words, we are living in peace time. However, I am not pleased with the level of Yoruba unity today and I am very concerned. Therefore, my greatest priority is the unity of the Yoruba race at home and in the Diaspora.
 
I will, therefore, spare no effort in ensuring the unity of Yoruba race within the contemporary Nigeria body polity.
 
To take the journey further, I will, after this installation, launch the Aare Ona Kakanfo Foundation. This will further promote the culture of the people and document the history of the Aare Ona Kakanfo title.
 
Since we are now in the era of Information Technology, we will be unveiling historical documents obtained from the Iku Baba Yeye on the Aare Ona Kakanfo title to a website.
 
2018 makes it the 30th year that the last holder of the title, Aare M.K.O. Abiola, stood before you for his installation. He died on July 7, 1998 and the post was vacant for almost 20 years.
 
Same happened when the 13th holder of the title, Aare S.L. Akintola, died on January 15, 1966. It took more than 22 years before his successor took over. Why? There is the myth that holders of the title will always die a violent death. But, this is not so because many holders of the title lived to be more than 100 years.
 
So, apart from setting aside the myth and projecting the image of the office, documenting the Aare Ona Kakanfo title will also let people know that a child born of humble beginning like me can make it.
 
From the extreme North of Yorubaland, Arigidi-Akoko in Akoko North West Local Government the rural area of Ondo State, here I am emerging as the Aare Ona Kakanfo.
 
WAY FORWARD
 
My second appeal as the Aare Ona Kakanfo goes to the Federal Government to attend to some of the major roads in Yorubaland that are critical to its citizens. These include Lagos-Ibadan, Oyo-Ilorin, Lagos-Badagry, Sagamu-Benin, Badagry-Lusada-Sokoto, Ibadan-Iwo-Osogbo, Osogbo-Ilesa, Ilesa-Akure-Owo-Lokoja and Lagos-Abeokuta.
 
It will also be a major plus if the government, as promised by President Muhammadu Buhari in his January 1, 2018 speech, attends to rail transportation as fast as possible.
 
The issue of power is also critical. This will empower artisans more.
 
Security is equally important. All these would aid the development of the tourism potential of the country.
 
Several countries, such as the United Arab Emirates (UAE), Britain, Turkey, Singapore, Kenya, Ethiopia, South Africa, Ghana, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia and Israel have diversified their economy to tourism.
 
I want to assure you that I will work with various stakeholders to turn our land into a viable tourist destination.
 
To our esteemed Governors in the South-West, I call for cooperation, no matter the party line. The Development Agenda for Western Nigeria (DAWN) Commission should be empowered. And I want you all to see me as a partner in progress.
 
I offer myself for service once it is for the advancement of the Yoruba race. The various groups in the South-West should also resolve their crises.
 
I will also persuade seven of our elders, who are not partisan, to work with me in uniting all Yoruba and resolve differences wherever they may arise.
 
PROFOUND APPRECIATION
 
In closing, let me express my profound appreciation to the Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces, President Muhammadu Buhari, Vice President Yemi Osinbajo, Senate President, Dr. Bukola Saraki and the Speaker of the House of Representatives, Rt. Hon. Yakubu Dogara, for their support.
 
I want to thank our host Governor, Senator Abiola Ajimobi, for his immense contribution towards the success of today’s event.
 
I also thank other governors for their support and contributions, financially and morally.
 
Let me thank all those who contributed to the success of this installation ceremony, especially members of the Planning Committee, the media and many others too numerous to mention.
 
I also want to thank my wife, Erelu Mojisola. She is a Pillar of Support and a Role Model for Women.
 
I want to assure all that as the 15th Aare Ona Kakanfo, I will use my position, God willing, to protect the interest of our land and our dear country Nigeria.
 
Mo ki gbogbo yin o
 
A dele bare o
 
Igba mi a tu ile Yoruba lara lágbara Olodumare, Amin.
 
Aare Ona Kakanfo Gani Adams
 
January 13, 2018.
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THE BIOGRAPHY OF OTUNBA GANI ADAMS, THE NEW AARE ONAKAKANFO

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In the heat of the Second World War, in 1941, the Prime Minister of Great Britain, Sir Winston Churchill, said the following words to General Bernard Montgomery, who was also known as the “Spartan General”, the hero of the Battle of Alamein, the Commander of the famous British Desert Rats and the Field Marshall of the British Armed Forces. He said:“Monty, never give in. Never give in. Never, never, never,never—in nothing, great or small, large or petty—never give in except to convictions of honour and good sense. Never yield to force. Never yield to the apparently overwhelming might of the enemy”.These are powerful and inspiring words from one of the greatest leaders that the world has ever known.This same admonition from Churchill seems to be the fire that has been propelling the actions of erudite activist and ace promoter of Yoruba culture and tradition,
 
 Otunba (Dr)Gani Adams.It is true that many people pass through life with great wisdom and talents. Only a few utilize these God-given 
gifts to His glory and the welfare of the people.It is also true that some people have greatness thrust upon them, while others attained greatness by dint of hard work.For Otunba (Dr.) Gani Adams, the National Coordinator of the Oodua People’s Congress (OPC) and Chief Promoter, Olokun Festival Foundation (OFF), the utilization of his wisdom and talent in the overall interest and welfare of his people have no doubt etched his name on the sands of history.Otunba  Adams, is a man of many parts; a visionary leader, a charismatic political activist, a reliable championof the rights of the masses, an embodiment of political morality and an epitome of humility. He is also a well-known traditionalist, whose dedication to the promotion and preservation of the culture and tradition of the Yoruba race remains unparalleled. And above all, Otunba Adams is a detribalized Nigerian, whose vision of a one united and prosperous Nigeria, based on equity and mutual respect for one another is 
unrivalled. Above all, he is a God-fearing leader. His relationship with his fellow man is never based on religious or tribal sentiment. For him, Christianity, Islam and Traditional religions are all sides of the same coin, with the three worshipping the same and one God. For a man destined for greatness, his steps were directed by Almighty God, who knew the roles destined for him to play on earth, and ensured that he was brought into the world through a union of two great families of Pa Lamidi Adams and Late Madam Dada Adams, nee Aduloju.The journey of life started for Otunba (Dr.) Gani Adams, on 30th April, 1970 at Arigidi-Akoko, in the present Akoko North-West Local Government Area of Ondo State, Nigeria. He attended many primary schools due to the nature of his father’s job. His educational exploits started at the Army Children’s School, Oturkpo, Benue State, where he got as far as primary three (3) before his father was transferred to Lagos, where he completed his primary school education at the Municipal Primary School, Surulere, Lagos, in 
1980.Otunba Adams proceeded to Ansar-Ud-deen Secondary School, Randle Avenue, Surulere, Lagos, for his secondary education before picking a interior decoration job at an Italian Construction Company, Visinoni Stabilini, Apapa, Lagos, from where he voluntarily resigned after some urge to establish his own Interior decoration business, Gadson Interior.But sequel to the bastardization of the socio-political and economic life of Nigeria, occasioned by the military fascist rule of that time, Otunba (Dr.) Gani Adams becamean active Pro-Democracy Activist in 1992. He pitched his tent with the Campaign for Democracy (CD), in the struggle to end military rule in Nigeria and instal parcitipatory democratic governance. Young Gani Adams had a big and daunting responsibility thrust on his shoulders when he became the Public Relations Officer (PRO), of Mushin Local Government Chapter of CLO in 1993 and Member of Oodua Youth Movement, OYM, a pro-Yoruba self-determination group.
He was a foundation member of the Oodua People’s Congress (OPC), when it was formed in 1994. And like the huge elephant that cannot pass unnoticed, Gani Adams was the overwhelming choice for the position of the first Deputy National Coordinator and nowthe National Coordinator of the group. This amiable High Chief from Arigidi Akoko, presents an interesting character with his crusade of selfless commitment to protecting Yoruba interest, not minding whatever happens to him in the course of the struggle. With his dedication to the wellbeing of Yoruba race; it is obvious that he has acted his script into history book. In spite of the vicissitude, Otunba (Dr.) Gani Adams is optimistic with great hopes and unwavering determinationthat Nigeria cannot survive as one entity unless the union is decentralized and the federating units granted self-autonomy status.Thirsty for self-improvement in the present challenging world, Otunba Adams returned to school to bag a Diploma in Tourism Management from the International 
Aviation School, Tema, Ghana in 2003. Not done, he went further to obtain another Diploma in International Relation and Strategic Studies from the Lagos State University (LASU) and capped it with a Bachelor’s Degree in Political Science from same Lagos State University (LASU).Otunba Adams is a firm believer in the belief that culture can be used as a vehicle for national integration and a platform for the realization of the elusive peace and love in our society.As a strong believer in the attributes of the Yoruba cultural heritage, his organization, the Olokun Festival Foundation, today remains the only Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) that is dedicated to the promotion and preservation of Yoruba culture and tradition. The Olokun Festival Foundation sponsors and participate in  the following festivals across Yoruba land. Eledumare Festival Ijora LagosAjagunmale Festival Lekki Lagos 
Osun Osogbo  OshogboOlokun festival Badagry Lagos Oya festival Kwara StateOke Ibadan festival Oyo State Oodua festival Ile-ifeGrandmothers’ festival Epe Lagos Olumo festival Abeokuta Ogun  Ifa festival Lagos Aje festival Agege Lagos Obatala festival Oyo State Oranmiyan festival Oyo State Okota festival Ondo StateOro festival,   Iseyin Oyo StateOgun Festival   Ikorodu LagosElegbara Festival     Shasa LagosOPU World Congress   Oyo State
National Youth Development Submit   LagosInteractive Session with LeadersOtunba Gani Adams Art Student Scheme LagosBirthday Anniversary LagosKudirat Abiola Remembrance LagosJune 12 Remembrance LagosNigerian Artisan Submit LagosRamadan Lecture LagosWorld Humanitarian Day LagosWorld Literacy Day LagosHeroes Day LagosXmas Carol Lagosamong several others.Also the Olokun Festival Foundation showcases beauty pageant in five of its festivals namely:Miss Oodua
Miss OlumoMiss OkotaMiss Olokun And Miss OyaHe has carried his cultural crusade across continents, Africa, Asia, Europe, Australia, North America, South America,  including: Brazil, Ghana, Ethiopia, Namibia, South Africa, India, Britain, France, Holland, Germany, Belgium and many others. Oodua Progressive Union (OPU) A Yoruba Socio Culturalgroup in the DiasporaIn 2011, he made landmark feats in major countries acrossEurope, Asia, Africa North America and South America where he launched chapters of the Oodua Progressive Union (OPU). Today, the OPU has registered its presence in 78 countries, where it has been launched, with more countries eager to join. It can be said that OPU is the largest Yoruba socio cultural association in  the Diaspora
 
 It is to his credit that a Yoruba socio-cultural organizationhas good representation in the United Kingdom, UK, Germany, Holland, France and many other countries spread across the globe.Service to Humanity:In furtherance of his efforts to ensure that the less-privileged in the society are lifted out of the dungeon of poverty, he founded the Oodua Economic Empowerment Initiative and the Gani Adams Foundation, saddled to empower the poor by giving them economic freedom.And also as a firm believer that peace is key to development, Otunba Gani Adams participated at the National Peace Forum (NPF), in the interest of peace and unity among Nigerians, and was subsequently appointed aPeace Envoy. Beside the NPF honour, he was also awarded the Ambassador for peace by the Universal Peace Federation and International Federation for World Peace. As a result of his selflessness, dedication and forthrightness to the affairs of his race, Otunba Gani 
Adams was nominated to represent the Yoruba race at the National Conference organised by the Federal Government of Nigeria in 2014. In recognition of his well-placed understanding of national and global security matters, He was made a member of the National Security Committee in the National Conference and Vice Chairman of the National Security Management, Sub Committee on National Security. He was a member of the National Peace Forum, organizedby the  Obasanjo-led government, through the then  Special Adviser on Inter -governmental Relation, Chief Rochas Okorocha.It is also on record that the current democratic dispensation was attained through the blood and sweat of some dedicated Nigerians, including Otunba Gani Adams.OGA, as fondly called by his admirers, was in the thick ofthe battle to ensure that the military return to the barracks to guarantee the return of democracy to Nigeria in 1999. 
This can be said to be one of his major achievements in life. For his believe and commitments to the struggle, he has visited and resided in several detentions in the Nigerian prisons and police cells. But at each occasion, he has come out stronger and more resolute, shaming the government that had hoped to kill his zeal and commitment to the struggle.
 
In recognition of his contributions to the development of Yoruba land, Otunba Adams has been honoured with many chieftaincy titles across Yoruba towns. Among them are: Otunba of ArigidiAkoko, Ondo State, Ajagungbade of Oodua Land (ANTP), Akinrogun of Erin Osun, Osun State, Ajagunla of Aala Land, KwaraState, Arogundade of Ode Omu, Osun State, Jagunmolu Olu –Ode of Ibadan Land Oyo State, Apagunpote of Igbeji land, YewaOgun State, Olunla of Ilikimu, Benin Republic,Otunba Atayese of IgosunEkiti, Ekiti State, Baba Isale Oja Daleko Market, Mushin Lagos State, Asoludero of Oshogbo Land, Osun State, Arogundade of Oodua Land, Ogun State, ApaseOodua of Ojokoro Land, Lagos State, Mayegun of Ijanikin, Bobaselu of Ado Kingdom, Seriki  Adini of ArigidiAkoko Land, Ondo State, Akinrogun of Iseyin Land Oyo State, Jagunmolu of Igangan Land Oyo State, Baba Oba of Agbamu Land Kwara State, Custodianof Oodua Legacy, Afetutu Soro Worldwide, Aare of Ibese Land Lagos State, Baba Ijo New World Assembly, Akure, Ondo State, Maiyegun of Oworo Kingdom, Lagos State, Maiyegun of Baiyekun Kingdom, Lagos State, Aare Akogun Atewonro of Ila Orangun Town, Osun State, Bobagunwa of Igbehin Land, Obafemi, Owode Egba, Ogun State, Akinrogun of Ikorodu Land Lagos State, Chief Apagunpote of Isheri Olofin Awori Land Lagos State, Olunla of Ojora Land, Lagos State and Agba-Akin of Ibereko Land, Badagry, Lagos State, Aniyikaye of IjeroEkiti Land, among several other honours and Chieftaincy titles.Otunba (Dr.) Gani Adams also has to his honour about 232 local and international awards.

 

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OPC Remains Non-Political And Non-Partisan

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The National Coordinator of the Yoruba social-cultural group, Oodua Peoples Congress, OPC, Otunba (DR) Gani Adams, has stated that the group which remains non-political and non-partisan has been providing security for prominent Nigerians, including top politicians. He however denied that his group have been the one providing security for the Speaker of the House of Representatives, Aminu Tambuwal, since his security details were withdrawn, but added that they can, if Tambuwal gives them the opportunity. It would be recalled that following Tambuwal’s defection to the APC from PDP on Oct. 28, his security details were withdrawn by the police. Gani however said although the group is from the South-West, it is detrabilised and meant to secure every NIgerian. “We are a detribalised group. Inasmuch as you ask for our security arrangement, if you have a very good job and not a person with questionable character, we have the right to secure you. “If the presidency calls for our services, we can secure them. We are not a partisan organisation. We will not dabble into politics. But if it is on a personal level, there is nothing bad in that, as long as he (Tambuwal) has the capacity to pay our boys. “There is no person in this country that the OPC cannot secure. We have specially trained security guards in our organisation; there are about 4000 of them. They have security experience, physical strength and psychological advantage. “We have the capacity to secure even governors. We usually don’t lobby for such services because we feel the government has the necessary agencies to secure them (officials). “What most people don’t know is that OPC is the one securing them and their properties. Most of the politicians, especially in the South-West and Abuja, our group secure them. Some of them have our members as aides and personal security,” Adams said. He also stated that contrary to popular beliefs that the group moves about with cutlasses and knives, they don’t, but work based on intelligence. “We have our internal training and orientation on security and they don’t need to carry guns before they secure you. They don’t need cutlasses or knives for security. You won’t see charms or anything intimidating or anything that can affect your religious belief on them.”

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HOW MKO ABIOLA WAS NEARLY PREVENTED FROM BECOMING THE GENERALISSIMO

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How the Alafin of Oyo and MKO Abiola overcame through the help of Chief Afe Babalola. 
 
The Aare Ona Kakanfo!
The Untold Story of How MKO Abiola Was Nearly Prevented From Becoming the Generalissimo
 
Where were you in 1987? That was the year Oba Yesufu Oloyede Asanike, Olubadan of Ibadan made history. Olubadan installed Moshood Kashimawo Olawale Abiola as the Bashorun of Ibadan. It was a prestigious title befitting of a distinguished personality in the mould of MKO Abiola.
 
That was the title of  the legendary Bashorun Oluyole who was the paramount chief of Ibadan in 1850. It was also the title of Bashorun Ogunmola who reigned between 1865 and 1867. It was therefore historic that exactly 120 years after the death of Ogunmola, MKO Abiola became the fourth person to be conferred with the prestigious title.
 
It was indeed a befitting honour for someone who had amassed chieftaincy titles from almost every town in Nigeria. As of the time of his installation in 1987, MKO Abiola was reputed to have over 150 chieftaincy titles. He was the Bobajiro of Ode-Remo. He was the Bada Musulumi of Gbagura Egba.
 
As he drove out of the palace of Oba Asanike that fateful day with his son by his side, MKO must have thought that he had reached the peak of traditional chieftaincy in Nigeria.
 
He was just settling down in his Ikeja home when he was informed that he had a call. Who was on the line? He asked before collecting the phone. It was the Alaafin of Oyo, Oba Lamidi Olayiwola Adeyemi III.
 
MKO snatched the phone. “Iku Baba Yeye, Igbakeji Orisa! Kabiyesi!” The newly installed Bashorun paid his homage to the foremost traditional ruler. Alaafin must be calling to congratulate me, MKO thought. Kabiyesi was however not calling to congratulate the business magnate.
 
“We have decided that you are to be conferred with the title of Aare Ona Kakanfo!” Kabiyesi informed him.
 
The phone nearly dropped from the hand of Bashorun. Aare Ona Kakanfo! The Generalissimo of Yoruba race! The Field Marshall for all descendants of Oduduwa! The portfolio held by Afonja, the founder of Ilorin! The title of Aare Obadoke Latosa of Ibadan – the scourge of Efunsetan Aniwura! The position held by the last premier of Western Region, Ladoke Akintola of Ogbomoso! 
 
For a single person to be Bashorun and Aare was unheard of. It was the ultimate! Traditionally, Bashorun is the Prime Minister. Aare is the Field Marshall. When Bashorun Gaa moved against Alaafin Abiodun around 1770, it was Oyalabi from Ajase (now Republic of Benin), the Aare Ona Kakanfo that came to the powerful monarch’s rescue. Now, Abiola was going to be both the Prime Minister and the Field Marshall!
 
Alaafin had spoken. MKO Abiola had no choice. The news spread like wildfire. Congratulatory messages poured in from all over the globe. Aare Ona Kakanfo was not just another title. It was the title. It was the father of all traditional titles. Father ke? No, it was the Grandfather of All Titles. If it were to be a national honour, it would be the equivalent of the Grand Commander of the Federal Republic!
 
Everybody in and outside Yorubaland was ecstatic at the choice of Abiola as the 14th Aare Ona Kakanfo. Well, almost everybody.
 
It happened that the Ashipa of Oyo, Chief Amuda Olorunosebi was not pleased with the choice of Bashorun MKO Abiola as the Aare. Ashipa was one of the prominent chiefs of Alaafin. He objected to the choice of the flamboyant publisher, an Egba man, as Aare Ona Kakanfo.  He went to Kabiyesi to protest. Iku Baba Yeye was adamant that MKO was eminently qualified to be the Aare Ona Kakanfo.
 
The Ashipa went back to his quarters at Isale Oyo. As MKO Abiola and the Alaafin were preparing for the installation of Bashorun, Chief Amuda was consulting with his lawyers. This was however unknown to the Alaafin. It was assumed that the Ashipa had been convinced to support Abiola’s candidacy.
 
Abiola was no ordinary person by any standard. He was larger than life. He was flamboyance personified. He was determined to make the chieftaincy installation as grand as possible. He invited all his contacts from all over the world. All the military governors were invited. A special invitation was delivered to the President, Ibrahim Babangida, who was a close friend of the Bashorun. African Heads of States cleared their schedules in order to honour MKO. Nigerian Embassies were issuing visas on daily basis. It was going to be a grand occasion.
 
Then the unthinkable happened! It started as a rumour. It was days to the installation.
 
‘Eti Oba nile, eti Oba l’oko, eniyan lo n je be.’ The ear of a king is everywhere. Iku Baba Yeye was in his palace when he heard from the grapevine that a case had been filed to stop the occasion! “Ewo! Sango o ni je! Abiodun o ni je! Aole o ni je!” Kabiyesi went on to invoke the names of his predecessors on the royal throne of Alaafin!
 
It was around noon when the phone rang in Ibadan. It was from the Palace, Oyo Alaafin. Chief Afe Babalola, the famous legal practitioner, picked the phone. After exchange of homage and royal blessings, Alaafin informed Afiwajoye of Ado Ekiti that Ashipa had filed a suit against the installation of MKO Abiola. Not only that, a motion ex parte for interim injunction had also been filed. It was apparent that Ashipa was not ready to gamble with his chance.
 
Though Kabiyesi did not say it, Chief Afe knew the urgency involved. Installation was on Saturday. The call came in on Tuesday.
 
Less than thirty minutes after the call, Chief Afe was almost at Oyo. The legendary lawyer covered the 57 kilometres between Oyo and Ibadan as if he was on a chariot. He proceeded to court where he met the court registrar. Of course, the registrar knew Chief Babalola. It is doubtful if there is anyone in the Judiciary who does not know the Mayegun of Modakeke. Mayegun paid the requisite fees and conducted a search of the court’s file. It was there! Alaafin’s information was correct!
 
Iduro ko si, ìbèreè ko si fun eni ti o gbe odó mi. A person who swallows a pestle can neither stand nor sit comfortably. Installation was on Saturday. The search was conducted on Tuesday! The motion ex parte was to be heard the following day, Wednesday.
 
Time was of the essence! Chief Afe turned his car around, off to Emmanuel Chambers, Ibadan. Before the car reached Fiditi, he had mentally finished composing the processes. He was nodding as the cases and other relevant authorities began to surface in his mind.
 
By the time he reached his office, the mental process was complete. In a minute the Counter-Affidavit was ready. There was no need for a Written Address. Professor Yemi Osinbajo was then a Special Assistant to the Attorney General of the Federation. It would be years later before he introduced Written Address as the Lagos State Attorney General. The counter-affidavit was filed and served on counsel to the Ashipa.
 
On Wednesday, the court was full. Chief M. L. Lagunju, Ashipa’s counsel was in court. He adjusted his wig and checked his books. He smiled. It was a Motion Exparte. It won’t be contested. He checked his time. Then there was some commotion at the entrance of the court.
 
Chief Lagunju blinked! He blinked again! Walking in majestically was the Afiwajoye of Ado-Ekiti, the Balogun of Mobaland, the Mayegun of Modakeke, Chief Afe Babalola in flesh! He was followed by a host of other lawyers, each armed with bags of legal authorities enough to open a law library. Chief Lagunju didn’t know when he said: “The game is up!”
 
On the dot of 9 O’clock, the Court began sitting. The trial judge was a royalty himself. Justice Aderemi’s father was the late Ooni of Ife, Oba Sir Tadenikawo Adesoji Aderemi, the first Governor of Western Region. The case was called.
 
The plaintiff’s counsel sought to move his application. The learned counsel informed the court that it was an ex parte application and therefore the other party had no right of audience.
 
His Lordship turned to Chief Afe Babalola. The court was as silent as a ghost town. Young lawyers craned their necks to hear what the Legend was going to say. They have been taught in law school that Ex Parte Motion was for only one party. Some of them must have been wondering what magic the Mayegun of Modakeke was going to perform.
 
Chief Afe Babalola brought out the White Book. Oh! Sorry, you don’t know the White Book? The White Book is an important book for lawyers. It contains the sources of law relating to the practice and procedures of the High Court. Ask your lawyer friend to show you a copy. He won’t charge you, unless you open it.
 
The Legal Colossus was on his feet. He was vibrating like a trumpet, but his voice was as soft as velvet. He began to reel out authorities after authorities to the effect that a defendant who became aware, anyhow, that a party had gone to court and was about to obtain an order ex-parte that would affect him, had a right to appear in court and to insist on being heard.
 
His Lordship – a brilliant Judge from the Source of Yoruba Race – was nodding as he scribbled down the authorities being cited by the Legendary Advocate. His Lordship was not the only one writing. Most lawyers in court were writing furiously. One old man turned to his friend and whispered: “I don’t mind selling my house, Mufu, my son must become a lawyer like this man. Look at the way he is speaking English as if he is chanting oriki Sango!”
 
“There is merit in the case of the Defendants. I agree with Chief Afe Babalola, the Defendants deserve to be given the right to be heard. Case is hereby adjourned to tomorrow for arguments on the Motion on Notice.” His Lordship rose. 
 
It is doubtful if the parties involved in the case slept that night. Whilst the lawyers checked and re-checked the authorities, the litigants were in anxiety mode. Chief MKO Abiola’s invited guests had started arriving from their various bases. Musicians engaged for entertainment had begun to set up their instruments in Oyo and Ikeja. Caterers had booked all the cows in Ilorin, Oyo and Ibadan. Local drummers had cancelled all engagements. The royal poet, Lanrewaju Adepoju had finished composing his masterpiece. All roads led to Oyo Alaafin.
 
If the court was filled to the brim on Wednesday, it was spilling over on Thursday. Litigants, journalists, lawyers, in fact everybody was in court that day. Chief Lagunju stood up. The learned counsel knew what was at stake. He argued his application expertly. He guessed the likely issues that Chief Afe would raise. He addressed each comprehensively. It was advocacy at its best.
 
Then the Balogun of Mobaland stood up. Like a surgeon, Chief Afe surgically cut through the issues deftly. He was not going to take any prisoner. After cutting through the issues, the authorities followed. From Halsbury’s Law of England to Commonwealth Law Reports, from decisions of House of Lords to decisions of Court of Appeal, from WACA to White Book, and then finally to the Supreme Court. The authorities were flowing like water from Asejire Dam.  There was no stopping the deluge.
 
“In the light of the copious authorities cited by the learned counsel for the plaintiff and the defendants, the Court will be adjourning to……” There was pin-drop silence in Court. The installation was only two days away.  “…Friday” Ha! Palpable relief went through the court. 
 
On Friday, Chief Afe Babalola’s phone began to ring from dawn. “Chief, E ma lo gba ruling yin l’Oyo loni o. Please send your junior o.” Clients, friends and well wishers who witnessed or heard of the tension soaked session in court on Thursday were justifiably apprehensive. But Chief Afe was not the Balogun of Mobaland for nothing. A General must not be afraid of the warfront. Off to Oyo.
 
Chief Afe had hardly left Ibadan when he started seeing policemen at strategic junctions on the road to Oyo. As they approached Fiditi, the number of policemen increased. By the time they got to Jobele, it was as if the Police College had moved its campus there. In the forest, on top of trees, in the bushes, and on top of buildings, the police were everywhere.
 
The Courtroom itself was no exception. More than fifty police officers joined lawyers and litigants in the courtroom. If you were not wearing a wig and you were not a party to the case, you would have to stay outside.
 
Court!
 
Justice Aderemi went straight to the business of the day. “RULING” His Lordship began. Time stood still as His Lordship went on to review the facts of the application and the authorities cited by the counsel for the parties. “In the final analysis…” Counsel and cops in the court became tense. “This application fails and is hereby dismissed.”
 
As if by telepathy, the crowd outside heard the ruling immediately! Shouts of joy erupted. Drummers who must have been hiding theirgangan drums under their agbada sprang out.Sekere came out. Agogo was not to be left behind. Chief Afe Babalola was pulled out of his car, The Balogun was placed squarely on the roof of the car. Women danced, men jumped. I’m not sure but one of the songs on that day must have been “Ajekun Iya ni o je”. I have to confirm this from Chief. May God preserve his life.
 
Alaafin was waiting in the Palace with his Council Members. For a moment, the Sango of our time, Iku Baba Yeye was close to tears. It was an emotional moment. MKO Abiola was called. The Bashorun shouted: “Allahu Akbar! Alhamdulillah.”
 
On Saturday, January 14, 1988, Oba Lamidi Olayiwola Adeyemi III installed Bashorun Moshood Kashimawo Abiola as the 14th Aare Ona Kakanfo. The famous Yoruba Poet, Lanrewaju Moshood Adepoju was then called to the podium. In his deep and flawless Yoruba, Adepoju movingly rendered traditional poetry tracing the history of the title and the qualities of the new Aare Ona Kakanfo.
 
Abiola smiled.
 
It was indeed a glorious day for the husband of Simbiat Atinuke. 
 
In recognition of his service to the Crown and the Law, Alaafin later conferred Chief Afe Babalola with the prestigious title of Aare Bamofin of Oyo Empire.
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THIS IS THE MEANING OF RESTRUCTURING AS CANVASSED BY SOUTHERN NIGERIA BY: Chief Olufalae

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FOR THOSE STILL GREEKED BY THE TERM, THIS IS THE MEANING OF RESTRUCTURING AS CANVASSED BY SOUTHERN NIGERIA BY~Chief Olu Falae
 
You know I am a leader in the South West and at the National convention, I was elected as the leader of the Yoruba delegation. So, I am central to the Yoruba position. The Yoruba position is my position and it is the same position I canvassed in my book, ‘The way forward for Nigeria’ which I launched since 2005 in Lagos. What we mean by restructuring is going back to the Independence Constitution which our leaders negotiated with the British between 1957 and 1959. It was on that basis that the three regions agreed to go to Independence as one united country. So, it was a negotiated constitution. This is because, if the three regions were not able to agree, there would not have been one united independent Nigeria. But because the three regions at that time negotiated and agreed to package a constitution, that is why they agreed to go to Independence together. When the military came in 1966 and threw away the constitution, they threw away the negotiated agreement among the three regions, which was the foundation of a united Nigeria.
 
So, the military did not only throw away the constitution but a political consensus negotiated and agreed by our leaders of the three regions in those days. When we say restructuring now, we are saying let us go back substantially to that constitution which gave considerable autonomy to the regions. For example, each region at that time collected its revenue and contributed the agreed proportion to the centre. But when the military came, they turned it round and took everything to the centre. That could not have been accepted by Ahmadu Bello, Nnamdi Azikiwe or Obafemi Awolowo.
 
This constitution we are using was made by late Gen Sani Abacha and the military; and Abacha came from only one part of Nigeria, so he wrote a constitution that favoured his own part of Nigeria. That is why I am saying, let us restructure and go back to what all of us agreed before. That is the meaning of restructuring. The regions used to be federating units, but in today’s Nigeria, they would now be called federal regions because states have been created in the regions. So in the West, you now have federation of Yoruba states which would belong to the Nigerian union at the centre. So, it is not like the region of old with all the powers. No. It is now going to be a coordinator of the states in the zone. That is what we mean by restructuring. And the regions would have a considerable autonomy as they used to have. For example, for the younger people, they may not know that every region then had its own constitution.
 
There were four constitutions at independence –the Federal constitution, Western constitution, Eastern constitution and Northern constitution. That was how independent they were and every region had an ambassador in London. The ambassadors for the regions were called Agent General so that you do not confuse them with that of Nigeria then called High Commissioner. So, Nigeria had four ambassadors in London. The ambassador for Nigeria then called a High Commissioner was M.T Mbu. The ambassador for Eastern Nigeria then was Mr Jonah Chinyere Achara, Western Nigeria was Mr Omolodun and for Northern Nigeria, it was Alhaji Abdulmalik. There were four of them. That was the kind of arrangement we agreed to, but the military threw it away and gave us this over-centralised unitary constitution. So, we said this is not acceptable any more; we must go back to the negotiated constitution which gave considerable autonomy to the regions, so that they can compete in a healthy manner. For example, Chief Obafemi Awolowo wanted to introduce free education in the West and other regions said they could not afford it, but he went ahead to introduce it in the Western region. He said he wanted to pay a minimum of five shillings a day, while others were paying two and three shillings. He went ahead and passed the law, making five shillings the minimum wage in Western Nigeria.
 
There was no problem with that. In Western Nigeria, the constitution provided for a House of Assembly and the House of Chiefs. In Eastern Nigeria, there was no House of Chiefs because they did not think they needed one. There was no problem with that and that is the kind of Nigeria we negotiated in London, but that is different from what we have today. So, we are saying let us go back to that arrangement which all of us agreed at independence and not what Abacha imposed on us, which is very partial, unfair and one-sided. That is the meaning of restructuring; it is to restructure unfairness and give semi-autonomy to the federating units.
 
Chief Olu False is a leading Yoruba leader and was Head of the Southwest Delegation to the Jonathan National Constitutional Conference.
 
NB: PLEASE HELP TO SHARE THIS PIECE WIDELY. EVEN THE DEVILS MUST BE FORCED TO READ THIS PIECE. THIS IS THE ONLY REDEMPTIVE WAY OUT FOR NIGERIA. EVERY OTHER THING WILL NEVER WORK!*CHIEF OLU FALAE SPOKE THE MINDS OF HONEST AND PROGRESSIVE NIGERIANS- THIS IS EXACTLY WHAT RESTRUCTURING NIGERIA IS ALL ABOUT* 
 
This beautiful piece by Chief Olu Falae is for  the education of the hypocritical,  genocidal, fake-prayer warrior, ICC bound war criminal called Gowon and other mischievous Nigerians , who pretend that they do not understand what restructuring is all about. This is 100% my position. God bless you Chief.  
 
FOR THOSE STILL GREEKED BY THE TERM, THIS IS THE MEANING OF RESTRUCTURING AS CANVASSED BY SOUTHERN NIGERIA BY~Chief Olu Falae
 
You know I am a leader in the South West and at the National convention, I was elected as the leader of the Yoruba delegation. So, I am central to the Yoruba position. The Yoruba position is my position and it is the same position I canvassed in my book, ‘The way forward for Nigeria’ which I launched since 2005 in Lagos. What we mean by restructuring is going back to the Independence Constitution which our leaders negotiated with the British between 1957 and 1959. It was on that basis that the three regions agreed to go to Independence as one united country. So, it was a negotiated constitution. This is because, if the three regions were not able to agree, there would not have been one united independent Nigeria. But because the three regions at that time negotiated and agreed to package a constitution, that is why they agreed to go to Independence together. When the military came in 1966 and threw away the constitution, they threw away the negotiated agreement among the three regions, which was the foundation of a united Nigeria.
 
So, the military did not only throw away the constitution but a political consensus negotiated and agreed by our leaders of the three regions in those days. When we say restructuring now, we are saying let us go back substantially to that constitution which gave considerable autonomy to the regions. For example, each region at that time collected its revenue and contributed the agreed proportion to the centre. But when the military came, they turned it round and took everything to the centre. That could not have been accepted by Ahmadu Bello, Nnamdi Azikiwe or Obafemi Awolowo.
 
This constitution we are using was made by late Gen Sani Abacha and the military; and Abacha came from only one part of Nigeria, so he wrote a constitution that favoured his own part of Nigeria. That is why I am saying, let us restructure and go back to what all of us agreed before. That is the meaning of restructuring. The regions used to be federating units, but in today’s Nigeria, they would now be called federal regions because states have been created in the regions. So in the West, you now have federation of Yoruba states which would belong to the Nigerian union at the centre. So, it is not like the region of old with all the powers. No. It is now going to be a coordinator of the states in the zone. That is what we mean by restructuring. And the regions would have a considerable autonomy as they used to have. For example, for the younger people, they may not know that every region then had its own constitution.
 
There were four constitutions at independence –the Federal constitution, Western constitution, Eastern constitution and Northern constitution. That was how independent they were and every region had an ambassador in London. The ambassadors for the regions were called Agent General so that you do not confuse them with that of Nigeria then called High Commissioner. So, Nigeria had four ambassadors in London. The ambassador for Nigeria then called a High Commissioner was M.T Mbu. The ambassador for Eastern Nigeria then was Mr Jonah Chinyere Achara, Western Nigeria was Mr Omolodun and for Northern Nigeria, it was Alhaji Abdulmalik. There were four of them. That was the kind of arrangement we agreed to, but the military threw it away and gave us this over-centralised unitary constitution. So, we said this is not acceptable any more; we must go back to the negotiated constitution which gave considerable autonomy to the regions, so that they can compete in a healthy manner. For example, Chief Obafemi Awolowo wanted to introduce free education in the West and other regions said they could not afford it, but he went ahead to introduce it in the Western region. He said he wanted to pay a minimum of five shillings a day, while others were paying two and three shillings. He went ahead and passed the law, making five shillings the minimum wage in Western Nigeria.
 
There was no problem with that. In Western Nigeria, the constitution provided for a House of Assembly and the House of Chiefs. In Eastern Nigeria, there was no House of Chiefs because they did not think they needed one. There was no problem with that and that is the kind of Nigeria we negotiated in London, but that is different from what we have today. So, we are saying let us go back to that arrangement which all of us agreed at independence and not what Abacha imposed on us, which is very partial, unfair and one-sided. That is the meaning of restructuring; it is to restructure unfairness and give semi-autonomy to the federating units.
 
Chief Olu False is a leading Yoruba leader and was Head of the Southwest Delegation to the Jonathan National Constitutional Conference.
 
NB: PLEASE HELP TO SHARE THIS PIECE WIDELY. EVEN THE DEVILS MUST BE FORCED TO READ THIS PIECE. THIS IS THE ONLY REDEMPTIVE WAY OUT FOR NIGERIA. EVERY OTHER THING WILL NEVER WORK!*CHIEF OLU FALAE SPOKE THE MINDS OF HONEST AND PROGRESSIVE NIGERIANS- THIS IS EXACTLY WHAT RESTRUCTURING NIGERIA IS ALL ABOUT* 
 
This beautiful piece by Chief Olu Falae is for  the education of the hypocritical,  genocidal, fake-prayer warrior, ICC bound war criminal called Gowon and other mischievous Nigerians , who pretend that they do not understand what restructuring is all about. This is 100% my position. God bless you Chief.  
 
FOR THOSE STILL GREEKED BY THE TERM, THIS IS THE MEANING OF RESTRUCTURING AS CANVASSED BY SOUTHERN NIGERIA BY~Chief Olu Falae
 
You know I am a leader in the South West and at the National convention, I was elected as the leader of the Yoruba delegation. So, I am central to the Yoruba position. The Yoruba position is my position and it is the same position I canvassed in my book, ‘The way forward for Nigeria’ which I launched since 2005 in Lagos. What we mean by restructuring is going back to the Independence Constitution which our leaders negotiated with the British between 1957 and 1959. It was on that basis that the three regions agreed to go to Independence as one united country. So, it was a negotiated constitution. This is because, if the three regions were not able to agree, there would not have been one united independent Nigeria. But because the three regions at that time negotiated and agreed to package a constitution, that is why they agreed to go to Independence together. When the military came in 1966 and threw away the constitution, they threw away the negotiated agreement among the three regions, which was the foundation of a united Nigeria.
 
So, the military did not only throw away the constitution but a political consensus negotiated and agreed by our leaders of the three regions in those days. When we say restructuring now, we are saying let us go back substantially to that constitution which gave considerable autonomy to the regions. For example, each region at that time collected its revenue and contributed the agreed proportion to the centre. But when the military came, they turned it round and took everything to the centre. That could not have been accepted by Ahmadu Bello, Nnamdi Azikiwe or Obafemi Awolowo.
 
This constitution we are using was made by late Gen Sani Abacha and the military; and Abacha came from only one part of Nigeria, so he wrote a constitution that favoured his own part of Nigeria. That is why I am saying, let us restructure and go back to what all of us agreed before. That is the meaning of restructuring. The regions used to be federating units, but in today’s Nigeria, they would now be called federal regions because states have been created in the regions. So in the West, you now have federation of Yoruba states which would belong to the Nigerian union at the centre. So, it is not like the region of old with all the powers. No. It is now going to be a coordinator of the states in the zone. That is what we mean by restructuring. And the regions would have a considerable autonomy as they used to have. For example, for the younger people, they may not know that every region then had its own constitution.
 
There were four constitutions at independence –the Federal constitution, Western constitution, Eastern constitution and Northern constitution. That was how independent they were and every region had an ambassador in London. The ambassadors for the regions were called Agent General so that you do not confuse them with that of Nigeria then called High Commissioner. So, Nigeria had four ambassadors in London. The ambassador for Nigeria then called a High Commissioner was M.T Mbu. The ambassador for Eastern Nigeria then was Mr Jonah Chinyere Achara, Western Nigeria was Mr Omolodun and for Northern Nigeria, it was Alhaji Abdulmalik. There were four of them. That was the kind of arrangement we agreed to, but the military threw it away and gave us this over-centralised unitary constitution. So, we said this is not acceptable any more; we must go back to the negotiated constitution which gave considerable autonomy to the regions, so that they can compete in a healthy manner. For example, Chief Obafemi Awolowo wanted to introduce free education in the West and other regions said they could not afford it, but he went ahead to introduce it in the Western region. He said he wanted to pay a minimum of five shillings a day, while others were paying two and three shillings. He went ahead and passed the law, making five shillings the minimum wage in Western Nigeria.
 
There was no problem with that. In Western Nigeria, the constitution provided for a House of Assembly and the House of Chiefs. In Eastern Nigeria, there was no House of Chiefs because they did not think they needed one. There was no problem with that and that is the kind of Nigeria we negotiated in London, but that is different from what we have today. So, we are saying let us go back to that arrangement which all of us agreed at independence and not what Abacha imposed on us, which is very partial, unfair and one-sided. That is the meaning of restructuring; it is to restructure unfairness and give semi-autonomy to the federating units.
 
Chief Olu False is a leading Yoruba leader and was Head of the Southwest Delegation to the Jonathan National Constitutional Conference.
 

 

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